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Living Room Design Photos with Slate Floors

Lawless Rereat
Lawless Rereat
Searl Lamaster Howe Architects
Designed in sharp contrast to the glass walled living room above, this space sits partially underground. Precisely comfy for movie night.
North Bay
North Bay
Prentiss Balance Wickline Architects
Photographer: Jay Goodrich This 2800 sf single-family home was completed in 2009. The clients desired an intimate, yet dynamic family residence that reflected the beauty of the site and the lifestyle of the San Juan Islands. The house was built to be both a place to gather for large dinners with friends and family as well as a cozy home for the couple when they are there alone. The project is located on a stunning, but cripplingly-restricted site overlooking Griffin Bay on San Juan Island. The most practical area to build was exactly where three beautiful old growth trees had already chosen to live. A prior architect, in a prior design, had proposed chopping them down and building right in the middle of the site. From our perspective, the trees were an important essence of the site and respectfully had to be preserved. As a result we squeezed the programmatic requirements, kept the clients on a square foot restriction and pressed tight against property setbacks. The delineate concept is a stone wall that sweeps from the parking to the entry, through the house and out the other side, terminating in a hook that nestles the master shower. This is the symbolic and functional shield between the public road and the private living spaces of the home owners. All the primary living spaces and the master suite are on the water side, the remaining rooms are tucked into the hill on the road side of the wall. Off-setting the solid massing of the stone walls is a pavilion which grabs the views and the light to the south, east and west. Built in a position to be hammered by the winter storms the pavilion, while light and airy in appearance and feeling, is constructed of glass, steel, stout wood timbers and doors with a stone roof and a slate floor. The glass pavilion is anchored by two concrete panel chimneys; the windows are steel framed and the exterior skin is of powder coated steel sheathing.
The Collector's Condo
The Collector's Condo
Simply Home Decorating
The homeowners of this condo sought our assistance when downsizing from a large family home on Howe Sound to a small urban condo in Lower Lonsdale, North Vancouver. They asked us to incorporate many of their precious antiques and art pieces into the new design. Our challenges here were twofold; first, how to deal with the unconventional curved floor plan with vast South facing windows that provide a 180 degree view of downtown Vancouver, and second, how to successfully merge an eclectic collection of antique pieces into a modern setting. We began by updating most of their artwork with new matting and framing. We created a gallery effect by grouping like artwork together and displaying larger pieces on the sections of wall between the windows, lighting them with black wall sconces for a graphic effect. We re-upholstered their antique seating with more contemporary fabrics choices - a gray flannel on their Victorian fainting couch and a fun orange chenille animal print on their Louis style chairs. We selected black as an accent colour for many of the accessories as well as the dining room wall to give the space a sophisticated modern edge. The new pieces that we added, including the sofa, coffee table and dining light fixture are mid century inspired, bridging the gap between old and new. White walls and understated wallpaper provide the perfect backdrop for the colourful mix of antique pieces. Interior Design by Lori Steeves, Simply Home Decorating. Photos by Tracey Ayton Photography
CASA RAMBED
CASA RAMBED
RAFAEL VARGAS FOTOGRAFIA SL
Katy Bedwell and Quim Larrea Arquitectos
Richmond Townhouses
Richmond Townhouses
Melbourne Design Studios (MDS)
Porter Digital / Melbourne Design Studios
The Barn
The Barn
Paul Uhlmann Architects
This residence was designed to be a rural weekend getaway for a city couple and their children. The idea of ‘The Barn’ was embraced, as the building was intended to be an escape for the family to go and enjoy their horses. The ground floor plan has the ability to completely open up and engage with the sprawling lawn and grounds of the property. This also enables cross ventilation, and the ability of the family’s young children and their friends to run in and out of the building as they please. Cathedral-like ceilings and windows open up to frame views to the paddocks and bushland below. As a weekend getaway and when other families come to stay, the bunkroom upstairs is generous enough for multiple children. The rooms upstairs also have skylights to watch the clouds go past during the day, and the stars by night. Australian hardwood has been used extensively both internally and externally, to reference the rural setting.
Hunters Hill - Water front property
Hunters Hill - Water front property
Dieppe Design
Engaged by the client to update this 1970's architecturally designed waterfront home by Frank Cavalier, we refreshed the interiors whilst highlighting the existing features such as the Queensland Rosewood timber ceilings. The concept presented was a clean, industrial style interior and exterior lift, collaborating the existing Japanese and Mid Century hints of architecture and design. A project we thoroughly enjoyed from start to finish, we hope you do too. Photography: Luke Butterly Construction: Glenstone Constructions Tiles: Lulo Tiles Upholstery: The Chair Man Window Treatment: The Curtain Factory Fixtures + Fittings: Parisi / Reece / Meir / Client Supplied
North Bay Residence
North Bay Residence
Prentiss Balance Wickline Architects
Photographer: Jay Goodrich This 2800 sf single-family home was completed in 2009. The clients desired an intimate, yet dynamic family residence that reflected the beauty of the site and the lifestyle of the San Juan Islands. The house was built to be both a place to gather for large dinners with friends and family as well as a cozy home for the couple when they are there alone. The project is located on a stunning, but cripplingly-restricted site overlooking Griffin Bay on San Juan Island. The most practical area to build was exactly where three beautiful old growth trees had already chosen to live. A prior architect, in a prior design, had proposed chopping them down and building right in the middle of the site. From our perspective, the trees were an important essence of the site and respectfully had to be preserved. As a result we squeezed the programmatic requirements, kept the clients on a square foot restriction and pressed tight against property setbacks. The delineate concept is a stone wall that sweeps from the parking to the entry, through the house and out the other side, terminating in a hook that nestles the master shower. This is the symbolic and functional shield between the public road and the private living spaces of the home owners. All the primary living spaces and the master suite are on the water side, the remaining rooms are tucked into the hill on the road side of the wall. Off-setting the solid massing of the stone walls is a pavilion which grabs the views and the light to the south, east and west. Built in a position to be hammered by the winter storms the pavilion, while light and airy in appearance and feeling, is constructed of glass, steel, stout wood timbers and doors with a stone roof and a slate floor. The glass pavilion is anchored by two concrete panel chimneys; the windows are steel framed and the exterior skin is of powder coated steel sheathing.
Birchgrove House
Birchgrove House
Melocco and Moore Architects
The living room pavilion is deliberately separated from the existing building by a central courtyard to create a private outdoor space that is accessed directly from the kitchen allowing solar access to the rear rooms of the original heritage-listed Victorian Regency residence.
North Bay Residence
North Bay Residence
Prentiss Balance Wickline Architects
Photographer: Jay Goodrich This 2800 sf single-family home was completed in 2009. The clients desired an intimate, yet dynamic family residence that reflected the beauty of the site and the lifestyle of the San Juan Islands. The house was built to be both a place to gather for large dinners with friends and family as well as a cozy home for the couple when they are there alone. The project is located on a stunning, but cripplingly-restricted site overlooking Griffin Bay on San Juan Island. The most practical area to build was exactly where three beautiful old growth trees had already chosen to live. A prior architect, in a prior design, had proposed chopping them down and building right in the middle of the site. From our perspective, the trees were an important essence of the site and respectfully had to be preserved. As a result we squeezed the programmatic requirements, kept the clients on a square foot restriction and pressed tight against property setbacks. The delineate concept is a stone wall that sweeps from the parking to the entry, through the house and out the other side, terminating in a hook that nestles the master shower. This is the symbolic and functional shield between the public road and the private living spaces of the home owners. All the primary living spaces and the master suite are on the water side, the remaining rooms are tucked into the hill on the road side of the wall. Off-setting the solid massing of the stone walls is a pavilion which grabs the views and the light to the south, east and west. Built in a position to be hammered by the winter storms the pavilion, while light and airy in appearance and feeling, is constructed of glass, steel, stout wood timbers and doors with a stone roof and a slate floor. The glass pavilion is anchored by two concrete panel chimneys; the windows are steel framed and the exterior skin is of powder coated steel sheathing.
Mid-Century Remodel on Tabor Hill
Mid-Century Remodel on Tabor Hill
Flavin Architects
In the Boston suburb of Lincoln, we renovated a mid-century modern home originally designed by Robert Coolidge, a contemporary of the famous modernist Walter Gropius. Our goal was to keep the integrity of the original design while creating more modern spaces that Coolidge himself may have designed if he'd had access to the materials and fixtures we have today. We riffed on the 1950's trend called a "floating kitchen" where the kitchen is free of the exterior wall allowing floor to ceiling glass. We also opened up the kitchen/dining area by creating custom upper cabinets, painted in Benjamin Moore "Rock Gray” that "float" below the exposed beam on the ceiling and above the Pental super white quartz counter top. We built on the home's original indirect lighting by adding new indirect lighting, including Bravo LED linear lights by Nora Lighting, to the kitchen work areas. Photo by: Nat Rea Photography
Whether you want inspiration for planning a living room with slate floors renovation or are building a designer living room from scratch, Houzz has 1,517 images from the best designers, decorators, and architects in the country, including Newberry Architecture and Flavin Architects. Look through living room photos in different colours and styles and when you find a living room with slate floors design that inspires you, save it to an Ideabook or contact the Pro who made it happen to see what kind of design ideas they have for your home. Explore the beautiful living room with slate floors ideas photo gallery and find out exactly why Houzz is the best experience for home renovation and design.