lockmac

How do we add a butlers pantry and straighten the hallway?

lockmac
April 23, 2019
last modified: April 25, 2019

Hi.

I've recently moved into my new house.

We have a few things we want to achieve with our renovation. Mainly, I want to add a butlers/walk in pantry somewhere. I was thinking of bringing the current wall that the fridge and stove are on forward to be in line with the meals area, and if necessary, move that wall back into the second living room a little bit and make this a walk in pantry behind the main kitchen area. The door would be on the right hand side (near the meals area).

Another idea I had, but would be expensive, would be to build a small extension that runs next to the Meals area and would have a sliding door.

Can anyone think of any other ideas?

My other problem with this is that I want to straighten out the hallway. I really dislike it currently how it isn't straight and even. If I was two do this, I would be reducing the size of the wall in the kitchen which probably wouldn't leave enough room for fridge/oven + door to potential rear walk in pantry.

Would love you hear some thoughts. I'm open to any changes.



Comments (11)

  • PRO
    MB Design & Drafting

    Certainly a fairly large house so this allows some scope to make the changes you're after.

    I would go with a walk in pantry rather than a 'butlers pantry'. Butlers pantry will go the way of rumpus rooms and home theatres in a few years. Personal opinion however....


    You could join study and dining together to make one large living area. Move study across to where existing living area is and divide up so you get your butlers pantry in there as well.

    This will allow you the opportunity to straighten up hallways, rework kitchen, etc. rather than adding more space via an addition (to an already large footprint).

  • oklouise

    my last suggestion from previous post


  • oklouise

    adding the pantry behind the kitchen make the kitchen, meals area and access around the kitchen island very cramped, there's a huge unused space between the kitchen and laundry and does reduce the length of the kitchen wall to allow for the pantry door ...perhaps having the door between the living area and kitchen closer to the laundry would allow more space for the kitchen but would mean the doorway would not be in a straight line from the front door?


  • oklouise

    some extra ideas without changes to external walls or windows, removing the ens bath would allow an extra biw and giant shower (although an external door from the ensuite could be great for access to the pool or courtyard) strongly suggest you keep the hallway entry to the powder room for easy access from garage and home office and, adding sliding doors could make the home office more flexible for a future baby's room, the original study divided into garage storage and mudroom, walk in new pantry with sink, replacing the crooked central walls allows for the pantry, extra storage, private access to the minor bedrooms and bathroom and a better location for the heater ...simple refurbishing of the kitchen and ensuite with relatively minor demolition and reconstructing of walls and storage could easily use up $150,000 so probably best to plan and price each area separately but there are extras like the sink in the pantry and handbasin in the family toilet that will improve comfort and be much better value than changing any external doors or windows


  • lockmac

    Thanks oklouise. With regards to your first design, I don't mind it actually, just very different to what we have now! Is it normal or weird to have the pantry across the hallway? I will take a look over your other designs, thank-you!

  • oklouise

    the original small pantry is in the same location and my idea is create a bigger pantry in the space you already have without compromising the other rooms but there's always other options...eg move the kitchen to the end of the family room and use bed 3 for the walk in pantry and rearrange access to the other rooms or use the meals area for the new pantry and rotate the kitchen but depends on budget and how you will use every room

  • kbodman14
    Just a thought, turn the eating area into a butlers pantry and place a table in the family which looks as though there is enough room.
  • lockmac



    What are everyones thoughts on the attached? We've decided to remove the nook where the dining room table currently is and propose putting in big sliding doors. Apologies - the roughly design is upside down.

  • oklouise

    without accurate dimensions it's impossible to be certain but, based on approximate measurements, this would be a very expensive renovation without adding anything more easily provided with much simpler changes ..there are many problems eg the new toilet is about 4m long and opens into the living room, lost separate eating area, smaller laundry, no separate mudroom, the master bedroom and ensuite are cramped,..the kitchen is blocked in by the office and where would you place sink stove and fridge?, the family room is smaller and now has to include the only dining table, the family bathroom and toilet open almost directly into the family room and you'll need new windows, walls, doors and serious changes to the roof structure and new floors and ceilings...there has to be a better option and plans need to include furniture and to be drawn to proper scale to identify how to move around the rooms and decide if you want to be able to listen to bathroom noises from the front door, lounge and family room


  • oklouise

    another variations with estimated dimensions

    but if the main goal is to have a pantry next to the kitchen your original idea of a small extension (skillion roofed non brick) would be more cost effective and not lose the small meals area overlooking the pool and garden

    adding the hallway to the family bathroom toilet and three bedrooms helps straighten out the central walkway and makes the area more private

  • lockmac

    Thanks for the comments and the revised plans. I will print these out and discuss with my partner. You bring up some great points. Thanks for taking the time :)